Wine & Frenchmen & Fashion Models on E. 3rd St.

October 24th, 2012 | 10:10 am | Daily News | 6 Comments

In their two collaborative videos with Cliché, DQM is attempting to convince us that it is a skate shop where you walk in to encounter notable fashion models and general people of French descent casually enjoying glasses of wine before a skate session. Though this purported reality deviates from the true, non-exagerated ambiance of DQM, the former Long Island resident known to some as “Black Keith” makes an almost convincing case for the existence of gentlemanly grown and sexy skaters on E. 3rd Street. They are a cheese plate away from fooling us.

Their actual skate session, which is a work of non-fiction, features important Lucas Puig footage, who is without a doubt the greatest skater of the Trilogy mold working today. (This means that he restricts himself to low impact street spots and still pushes switch mongo. In other words, he is relatable to the common man because he skates on things that we can all skate, except at a significantly higher skill level.) The video, perhaps more than any other “Summer in New York” piece in the 2012 cycle, illustrates a growing theory that with the knobbing of America’s greatest unintentional skatepark, the westside has become the new Water Street in terms of most commonly chartered weekend session ground. The tide has shifted west.

Video by Richard Quintero. Here’s a link to part one.

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Turn On the Lights

September 17th, 2012 | 9:19 am | Daily News | 2 Comments

It may look like a skatepark, but you can’t skate here.” — Volume 2

Four decades ago, Louis Kahn unintentionally designed an incredible skate spot, which is just now being opened to the public. The chances of ever being able to skate there for an excess of twenty seconds are likely non-existant.

“I get mad bodied.” Kevin Tierney stretching the grammatical boundaries of modern New York slang, and out-of-towners raising awareness of the disdain for “Two times if you know me” greetings in the northeast, in yet another “Summer in New York” clip.

Island Music is a video entirely filmed in Long Island by the same crew that brought you Missing Persons (which strangely disappeared from YouTube) last year. Based off the teaser, it looks like it’s going for a similar black-and-white jazzy feel. Anything inspired by the by the best skate montage in skate montage history is cool.

Skateboarding, fiction writing, and uh, Mike Carroll’s Modus Operandi part.

Where would east coast skateboarding be without the wallie? This clip has a lot of wallies, wallrides, and other NY/NJ/PA skate hallmarks.

Apple could call the iPhone 4S a different name, and millions of people would still ditch the current model for it. Crazy.

Is Palace the next Apple? The next Supreme? The next Menace? The next Maybach Music? Because this is wild (£137 = ~$220.) Also in the realm of skate-gear resale values, Lamborghinis apparently appreciate in value.

Events: 1) Polar Skateboards, Thrasher, Converse, KCDC, etc. are holding a Bum Rush the Spot event at the BQE Lot off Lorimer this Saturday, September 22 from 4 to 6 P.M., followed by a Polar art show at KCDC. 2) File under “Demos Grown-Ups Might Attend” — Cliché and DQM are holding a demo at the L.E.S. Park on Thursday, so you could see French Mariano skate in real life.

Spot Updates: 1) The remaining ledges at Seaport that were not knobbed, have all been barricaded off as of a few days ago. Again, New York sucks sometimes. Developers are idiots. Spot’s done. 2) Those new good material / bad set-up ledges on 53rd and Sixth got knobbed. 3) Oh, and those new high wooden blocks by the Banks / Fulton Street Burger King (R.I.P.) also got knobbed.

Our homie Ren made his first music video. Unlike Black Donald Trump, he doesn’t skate, but his video is chill. Everybody raps.

And once again: If you can’t ollie up it, don’t ollie down it.

Quote of the Week:


29 Random Things That Happened at #NYFW.” Check #9. We out here.

Video Review: 10,000 Kilometers

August 4th, 2010 | 3:11 pm | Features & Interviews | 5 Comments

White people have a categorical list of things that they want to accomplish in their lives. Many of these have been touched upon throughout the really-funny-when-I-first-read-it-but-slowly-got-less-interesting website, “Stuff White People Like,” and let’s be serious, much of that site is overwhelmingly true. If you were to look at these categories and size them up in accordance with which ones are most complex, travel would outrank home renovation by a narrow margin, and fall slightly short of reaching the crown jewel, education.

There is a whole myriad of travel plans that white people love to talk about, and they don’t simply end at going to Paris, India, or some b-list country in Europe that may or may not have been run by a bunch of drunk Russians that eventually fell asleep in the snow, and were not seen until they were thawed out the following spring. The means of travel is an important facet of the category, because merely taking an airplane is not enough to solidify yourself worthy of extended conversations in an all-white context. At a beginner to intermediate level, there is the cross country American trip, which needs a baby blue Corvette, a grey 1955 Chevy, or whatever the hell Kerouac and those bums drove around in throughout those books they wrote. But once you begin to advance yourself in the travel category, the necessity of completing a two-continent journey becomes to loom over aging white adult life. And there is nothing more heavily romanticized, and as closely associated with old writers that died broke than extremely long train rides.

An idea that skateboarding has been toying with for quite some time is documenting itself in an out-of-context surrounding. It can be seen in everything from the days in the late-eighties when it was actually odd to see a pro skating New York as opposed to California, right through that whole Area 51 gimmick that Transworld ran with in Transmission 7, and the current day obviousness that comes with pros like Kenny Reed being that guy who will go to some country without a sewer system so that he can skate some crusty hubba ledge with a cool background. Billy Rohan basically gave us the skateboard headline of the summer by going to Iraq, so placing skateboarding out-of-context hasn’t exactly become boring yet.