Embracing Unreality — The 2016 Dime Glory Challenge

August 10th, 2016 | 12:43 pm | Features & Interviews | 13 Comments

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Words and Photos by Zach Baker

“I love Montreal so much, but every time I come here, I’m such a piece of shit.” — Jersey Dave

Skateboarding is all spectacle, but I understand that you’re up in arms about the International Olympic Committee treating it like the highly-commercialized mainstream sport that it is. You’re asking “how can you even judge skateboarding? It’s art, bro.”

Dime, in the Canadian tradition of being smarter, funnier and better at skateboarding than us, addressed this dilemma long before Tokyo 2020 was even a discussion. But still, we’re here deciding which kickball court to skate piles of refuse in, pleading, “how could they do this to us? This isn’t the 200 meter backstroke…this is skateboarding!” Yes, aside from the fact that smoking weed makes you better at it, skateboarding has very little in common with competitive swimming.

As descendants of the land that brought us the Montreal Screwjob, Bret “The Hitman” Hart, and Robert “Sluggo” Boyce, the Dime boys recognized what the future of skateboard events could and should look like. Let me tell you, it looks a lot like professional wrestling.

An Interview With Antosh Cimoszko

August 3rd, 2016 | 9:52 am | Features & Interviews | 2 Comments

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Photo by Antosh

Throughout the 2000s, it seemed like the majority of Canadian skateboard media making it over the country’s southern border was from Vancouver. British Columbia was the most common lens through which we observed Canada’s often superior breed of skateboarder. Ironically, as Canada became a shining beacon of culture, #views, sorrys and glory challenges for Americans throughout the 2010s, Vancouver took a backseat to the country’s eastern cities.

Antosh’s videos and the extended family behind the elusive Clubgear umbrella have been one of our main portals into the Vancouver skate scene as the east has taken the spotlight. The spots from Baby Steps might be capped, but the spirit remains strong.

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Where are you from and how did you get into skateboarding?

I’m from a town called Tsawwassen that’s 45 minutes outside of Vancouver. There’s downtown Vancouver and there’s greater Vancouver, which can be almost two hours out. I started skating with a few of my friends around grade three, doing airs off a piece of plywood on some bricks, skating a flatbar and whatever else in my friends driveway. A couple of years ago, I moved downtown and started filming way more, and not leaving downtown as much.

Would you venture out to the city when you lived in Tsawwassen?

I’d go downtown when I was 12 or 13. I remember the first time we went, this homeless lady came running towards us yelling and asking if she wanted us to see her masturbate. Downtown Vancouver used to be a bit more recognized in bigger skate videos, like all the Girl dudes would come up and skate it a lot before everything got capped. Once those spots started getting harder to find, people started skating differently.

It feels like when I was growing up, the focus on Canadian skateboarding was always in Vancouver. In the past few years, it feels like it moved towards Toronto and Montreal. Did that actually happen or am I making it up?

Vancouver definitely seemed like more of a hub for skating a while back. I’m not sure if it had to do with everything getting capped or people realizing there were more spots in Toronto and Montreal, but honestly, Vancouver doesn’t have spots. You just have to skate whatever. It’s hard to find a ledge in Vancouver. If one pops up, it’s there for a week, and then it gets capped. Things get built here in a way that understands people are going to skate on them, so they make it harder.

There used to be a larger crew here, but it feels like everyone moved to different areas these past few years. A lot of dudes are from Calgary, and move to Vancouver because it’s pretty close, but eventually shift out east. Montreal was always the place to move to but more people are moving to Toronto now, too.

Same City, Same Tricks, Just Skating

August 1st, 2016 | 5:03 am | Daily News | 6 Comments

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Quartersnacks’ Canadian Headquarters

The Bunt Podcast has an interview with Canadian sweethearts Ben Blundell and Tyler Warren about crook shoves, getting beat up by “chongos,” filming for the upcoming Antisocial video, Clint Walker beef, etc. Made me #lol more than a few times.

I’m not going to sit here and tell you that this Geoff Campbell part doesn’t have the most # Quartersnacks # trick selection ever.

Andrew Allen’s part in the new Hockey promo is absolutely incredible. Also features the first full Ben Kadow part since maybe \m/ ? Oh AND! Tino Razo did a heartfelt interview with Andrew Allen for Monster Children.

Transworld posted the photos and interview from Cyrus’ AM issue feature.

Here’s an annotated map of Pulaski by Jimmy Pelletier, one of the spot’s longest tenured filmers. “If you called 202-638-9511 on the other side of the pole, a homeless person would usually answer and you could ask if there were any skaters across the street. If they said ‘yes,’ you asked them to yell one of them over to the phone.”

The line-up and challenges for skateboarding’s greatest contest has been released.

“The general consensus with the politicians in Copenhagen is that this is a capital, it’s noisy, people come here to party, have a good time and we need to make the most of that. If it gets too noisy, then move to the country: this is a capital city. I’m not even going to take credit for that, it comes from the politicians.” Basically, Copenhagen is the fucking greatest, and we can’t have nice things in the U.S. #FDT

The New York Times did a feature on the Brujas crew up in The Bronx.

Everything You Wanted To Know About the Blobys But Were Too Afraid To Ask.

Johnny and co. at the new McCarren Skatepark.

An interview with the guy who answered the phones at World Industries.

“Are the recent techy stabs a sign that the tide finally is turning away from simplicity or just further fodder to an every-ten-years-tech-shoe fad?” Boil the Ocean re: the resurgence of tech-heavy skate shoes.

Cons put together a chill comp of Sage’s footage from their world tour.

John Shanahan and LurkNYC spent a couple of days in Montreal.

Quote of the Week: “That’s the good thing about skateboarding — it doesn’t really matter.” — Marcel Veldman

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First Day Out

May 31st, 2016 | 1:02 am | Daily News | 6 Comments

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Late start to the week bc of the holidays :)

Attn: Hot new trendy country Canada — Blue Tile and Antisocial have new QS gear in.

The I-Beam is the hottest T.F. obstacle since the Tombstone.

Like every facet of American life, skateboarding was hit hard by the 2008 recession. Lurker Lou has an oddly insightful glimpse into the industry of the pre-recession, pre-iPhone era by giving a 2007 Thrasher a last look. “Respect the Machnau.”

Here’s post-Love Park life in Philadelphia, with a Grandpa cameo in Cell Jawn #26.

Yo for like a casual, pre-premiere session around the Lower East Side and Chinatown, this clip of the Volcom team before the Holy Stokes screening has some jams in it. Nobody’s ollied those two double bump-to-bars on Madison before, right?

Fakiehillbomb went skating with QS-favorites, the Hungarian Rios Crew in Budapest for two weeks, and came back with this bit of low-def photojournalism.

I mean, for a varial flip on a l*ngb**rd, it’s perfect.

What you know about skateboarding in Nicaragua bro?

The Green Zine interviewed John Shanahan about #fits and the resurgence of shove-it reverts, and Venture remixed a good bit of his LurkNYC footage.

Even if you skate zero transition, there are certain skate landmarks you gotta pay a visit to just because (think Burnside, the Christiana bowl, etc.) The La Perla pool in San Juan, Puerto Rico is on that list. Monster Children did a quick story on the spot’s history, and how it slowly revitalized one of the slummiest parts of San Juan.

As per the note re: everyone still wanting to see Todd Jordan skate in Lou’s segment, here’s his gem of a “Wheels of Fortune” section, checking off every box of late-90s/early-2000s New York skate nostalgia:

The Canal Wheels section from Transplants is now online.

Cafe Creme has an interview with multiple People’s SOTY winner, Dennis Busenitz.

Dane Vaughn skates some New York rooftops.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Gotta be Steph’s 4-on-1 off glass lay-up to close out the first half last night? What’s everyone thinking, Warriors in six? Durant leaves?

Quote of the Week
Inquisitive Gentleman: “Have you ever seen a shark out in the water?”
Dave Dowd: “I don’t believe in sharks.”

‘Like’ This Post If You’re Going Skateboarding in 2016 Dressed Like Wade Desarmo in 1998

May 11th, 2016 | 3:09 pm | Time Capsule | 1 Comment

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Maybe I’ve been spending too much time around the the Vert God, but it’s becoming tough to deny the switch hardflip’s increased value among the social media skateboard landscape. We’re entering a post-Ryan Gallant/post-Matt Miller world, meaning people are no longer ashamed to whip out their non-flipping hardflips in public. Imperfect hardflips of the less-than-Gallant variety have entered the playful realm of “dad tricks.” There’s charm to their imperfection.

And what better lo-def, rickety flatground switch hardflip to go down in the un-storied history of the trick, than in fashion time traveler Wade Desarmo’s first-ever part, which was released the same year as ATCQ‘s last album. It’s almost unfair dude ended up being the only Canadian to crack the 2012 #phatstylez master list — seeing as how he had a H.G Wells G-Wagon to predict the 6XL Umbro jersey + bucket hat look fifteen years before it would adorn undersized caucasians who skateboard in the New York metropolitan area.