March Madness

March 23rd, 2015 | 4:55 am | Daily News | 7 Comments

cyrus UN

Photo by Zach Malfa-Kowalski.

Cyrus is on Polar, Ben K is on 3D, and Steve Nash retired.

Found this podcast piece about “defensive architecture” with Ocean Howell really interesting (he’s an architecture professor now.) His points about developers positioning skateparks in rundown areas so they give way to gentrification seem to make sense. (Check where on the map the new Jersey City skatepark will be.) We might even be under homeless people on the persona non grata list though e.g. we been kicked out of FedEx while a homeless guy was firing up a crack pipe worry-free fifteen feet away from the security guard before…

An interview with Chad Bowers, former Alien Workshop team manager and principal figurehead behind Mother Collective about working for and starting a skateboarding company in…Ohio. “They forgot about the fourth coast.”

Nieratko interviewed Bill Strobeck on the occasion of cherry’s one-year anniversary.

#MPC: 1) HD video blog #9 from Johnny Wilson. 2) Max Palmer, Andrew Wilson, John Choi from Dime, et al. with one of the better clips from the now defunct Coda warehouse. 3) Some Paych second angles via Paul Young.

New Hi-8 clip (oxymoron?) with all the Bronze dudes.

Slam has a quick photo feature with the bro Rob Mathieson from his time in New York.

Hey, these guys like Virtual Reality Bump as much as we do!

There are some hot moves in this Evan Dittig part for Underground Skate Shop.

SMLTalk looks back the the first-ever skate re-edit contest. What up Jeremy.

Dunno what the deal with this blurry and dark Leo Gutman re-edit is (art?), but it was a good reminder to revisit The Brodies part that earned him Q.S.S.O.T.Y honors in 2013.

Even though he is quite obviously the entire QS office’s favorite skateboarder, it should be noted that Lucas’ slappy back smith IG vid was not the first known documentation of said maneuver on social media. This guy did it for the Vine back in January.

QS Sports Desk Play of the Week: Nice to see J.R. Smith excelling in a city with minimal nightlife. Imagine him on the Thunder? He might become MVP.

Quote of the Week: “Tribeca is like the Equinox of skateparks.” — Connor Champion

#TRENDWATCH2013: Triangles

July 31st, 2013 | 9:25 am | Daily News | 24 Comments

triangles copy

Navigating the volatile skateboard industry is no easy task for prospective small business owners. A few blunders with art direction and hires of skaters preoccupied by beer or art, and sixteen months later, they’re back telling the old story about how “nobody starts a skateboard company to make money.” But recent start-ups have found a believed-to-be shortcut to success: triangles.

Over the past several years, Palace seems to have written a blueprint on how to succeed in the hardgoods market with three vertices. Using a Penrose triangle, the brand has been able to win over older nerds jaded by a kid-targeted skate industry, the world’s best Instagramer, London socialites, dyslexic counterfeiters, and pretty much anyone else who doesn’t spend an unhealthy amount of time on the internet arguing about how Shawn Powers “isn’t good enough to be sponsored.” Such success was unprecedented for newly established companies in the post-2008 meltdown world, and the triangle was front and center, even falling victim to easily amused parodists.

Those who can’t leave da game alone because da game may or may not need them took notice, and likely structured their business plans with triangles in mind.

#TRENDWATCH2013: The Nineties

June 26th, 2013 | 2:07 pm | Daily News | 12 Comments

90s trendwatch

Really, are the nineties ever not trending? Whether someone is putting VHS effects on footage, technical wizardry that Peter Smolik is never properly credited for, or the legions of YouTube users asserting “this was when skating wuz real” on any pre-2000 part, the decade is never completely irrelevant. In recent times, lesser-known companies from the nineties have been finding their way back in skateboarding, though they remain unrelated to that decade’s proprietors.

EXHIBIT A: As a Connecticut native, Brian Anderson, head of the Skate Mental-affiliated start-up 3D Skateboards, must have been aware of the CT-based 3D Innovations in one way or another. But if you’re familiar with the past two months of Slap gossip, and happened to wake up in Copley Square circa 1994 tomorrow morning, things might be a bit confusing. The differences are obviously there. One has “Skateboards” after its name, the other has “Innovations.” One specializes in hard goods, the other in apparel. One is rumored to have one of skateboarding’s most exciting new rosters, the other is notable in that its video features rare documentation of Mike Graham. Provided the would-be roster is true, and add in the cult following behind Skate Mental’s art direction, 3D Skateboards is destined for a bright future. It’s just not the first time a Connecticut-born mind envisioned skateboarding products in the third dimension. The nineties are inescapable!

EXHIBIT B: Like Exhibit A, given New York’s status as the only place in America that French people aren’t bred to hate, someone involved with France’s Metropolitan Skateboards must have been aware of Metropolitan Wheel Co. If not, the three leading scanners on the skateboard internet made it a point to scan every ad from the Deluxe-distributed, New York-based company’s brief run. Metropolitan Skateboards had been around in some form prior to their 2013 relaunch (they were the company to turn Leo Valls pro before Magenta), but they likely got early word of the decade being especially prominent in this year’s #trendwatch, rightfully assuming it was the right market for a reboot.