Who the HELL Waxed Three Up Three Down?

October 9th, 2014 | 1:33 am | Spot Updates | 25 Comments

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…and Torey Pudwill hasn’t been in town, we checked his Instagram.

Let us reiterate: Three Up Three Down is not about being good at skateboarding.

Much like lower-and-middle income New Yorkers are being priced out of Manhattan, more able-bodied skateboarders are ousting us from plebeian Manhattan street spots. The rich are never content just having a little bit — they want it all. Dylan Reider was the trailblazer for legitimizing Three Up Three Down after years of professional skateboarder indifference, but his one-percenter cronies were soon to follow. This quite obviously included some would-be 2014 Danny Gonzales. Go back to Cali dude.

LEAVE OUR SPOTS ALONE! There are enough places to be good at skateboarding in New York City, but not nearly as many if you’re not particularly great at it. Just because the Courthouse Drop is unskateable, doesn’t mean you have to wax our beloved two-and-a-half stair. Three Up Three Down is where Mouse-era Ben Sanchez would film a part if he were teleported to New York in the 2010s, not where the Grizzly team should be poised to film half of their 2014 “Summer Trip to New York” clip.

With Southbank saved, it’s time we, as common folk, initiate a new campaign — C.A.P.S. (Commoners Against Professional Skateboarders.) Consult the video below and observe just how much chiller all those lines look than some stupid twenty-foot-long backside lipslide to tailslide.

What’s next, Bryan Hermans brings a picnic table to Virtual Reality Bump?

We Never Hungover

October 6th, 2014 | 5:20 am | Daily News | 15 Comments

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Quartersnacks colorway Alltimers Lambo cruisers now available at Supreme NY. They have tees, too. Webstore is still cracking, but we’re sold out of cruisers.

Skateboard tricks are sorta just stupid now.

Diamond Days #76. This one is fairly street.

New Ishod and Seaport 5.1-heavy video blog from Johnny Wilson and friends.

Blonde Reider is pretty sick. 99% sure he’s the first one to skate the second level of the Columbus Circle statue ledge from flat. Someone good should noseslide it.

You probably caught the Puleo and Wenning sections from In Absentia, but you might’ve missed the more under-the-radar parts from Rodney Torres, who has always been a bit ahead of his time, especially by east coast standards, and Andy Bautista, which contains tons of Logic #6 B-sides. R.I.P. Hoboken Ledges.

“This is a bad example, but you know like in Dodgeball, when the evil team comes out and they’ve got the best uniform, and everyone else has mixed shirts? I like that look.” Complex has a rather detailed interview with Lev Tanju.

DC Shoes is five years late on trying to merge the scene with the board. Who on their team is even partyboy-enough (in the #nyfw sense of the word) to legitimately be the face behind that shoe? Is Nyjah poised for a more fashionable rebrand?

This is what skateboarding in Alaska looks like.

The landing for that first 360 flip is literally cobblestones.

The Gonz doesn’t like Brooklyn, and Kevin Lowry cruising around non name brand New York spots is a fun watch. (Do any NBA fans find it confusing that there is a Canadian skateboarder named Kevin Lowry, and a basketball player on a Canadian team named Kyle Lowry? Or is this only a problem in the QS office?)

VHS Mag has a new interview with the first or second best skater from New Jersey, Quim Cardona.

“Best duo since Outkast” might be a hyperbole, but who really cares.

Quote of the Week: “We wanted to send PLG [Pierre-Luc Gagnon] some Dime gear, and asked him what size he was. He goes, ‘I’ll take larges for skating, and mediums for the club.'” — Antoine Asselin

How long is that new T.F. box going to stick around? How long until there’s a 24-hour police patrol at that new concreted spot downtown? Sorry for so many questions today. We are feeling very #existential.

Five Favorite Parts With Jake Johnson

October 3rd, 2014 | 11:53 am | Features & Interviews | 7 Comments

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Photo by Jared Sherbert

As you continue skating into adulthood, your friends become your favorite skaters. Sure, there’ll always be a few select favorite pros, but once you reach past that thirteen-year-old-self’s dream of getting sponsored, and realize life as the next Eric Koston probably won’t happen, inspiration begins to come from those around you. Your friend’s kickflip will probably get you more hyped than even Wes Kremer’s*, because it’s right there with you, every time you skate.

Jake Johnson is sponsored and rather good at skateboarding. Yet he abides by a similar process in selecting his favorites. There’s just something special in watching parts of someone after actually knowing how they skate in real life.

*Singling out Wes because he initiated a three-way-tie with Lucas Puig and Bobby Worrest for “Literally Everyone’s Favorite [Pro] Skater” after that ten-minute raw footage clip.

Happy Birthday Dre

October 2nd, 2014 | 12:34 pm | Time Capsule | 5 Comments

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If you follow NY Skateboarding, you have no doubt caught onto In Absentia, a late-nineties, early-2000s B-roll video from filmer Jim Hodgson. A bunch of the footage is semi-recognizable from sessions that yielded tricks in Photosynthesis (+ the QS-favorite Pops/Wenning commercial), Logic, and the first two issues of Zoo York’s EST video magazine. The most widely circulated editions are Tim O’Connor and Anthony Pappalardo’s sections. Today’s post of Bobby Puleo skating in a chain and doing switch frontside heelflips is sure to get passed around a bit as well. There are still five videos in the playlist locked on private, and based on the BGPs in other editions, you’d think at least Wenning and Andy Bautista sections are on the way.

BUT, we’re not here to talk about those guys. Today is Andre Page’s birthday. In Absentia has a lesser-seen Andre Page section.

The past few interviews on QS have coincidentally taken a “no excuses” theme. Not to put him completely on blast, but Dre is really pushing 40 today. A lot of the names popping up in this video are way from the past; you haven’t heard about many of these dudes skating in years. Dre, on the other hand, hit me up to meet at T.F. after work today. He then told me he took tomorrow off…so that he could skate. Next question: “What are you doing this weekend? I’m trying to have a pizza party at Tompkins.” If you have two functional legs, there really are no excuses. Unless you spent yesterday skating D7 (you idiot), there really is no “I’m too sore” in your twenties. Break out the foam roller. Someone ~double your age is out here trying to front shove a bump-to-bar.

Happy birthday Dre. Loving father to dozens of lost skateboarders, humanitarian, eccentric entrepreneur, and practitioner of one of the highest ollies in New York City…at damn near 40.

“I have probably spent a million dollars on skateboarders in my life.” — Andre Page

There are a lot of good sections in In Absentia, but we are going to keep it Jersey-centric for the bonus inclusions:

Late Pass: All This Mayhem

October 1st, 2014 | 1:26 pm | Reviews | No Comments

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“Why the hell would I want to watch a documentary about two Australian vert skaters?”

That thought likely popped into many people’s heads when told they should watch All This Mayhem, the Tas and Ben Pappas documentary that was released last month.

“No dude, it’s really crazy, watch it.”

Considering there is already a documentary about Gator and the surfboard bag, how much more “crazy” could a skate documentary get, especially to elevate it beyond what we expect in an Epicly Later’d or a similar straight-to-web series of shorts?

In assessing the horrible P.R. behind Australians visiting New York (see point B), a frequent gripe — mostly from those who work in hospitality or nightlife industries — is their love of cocaine. Cocaine is believed to be a major source of awful Australian behavior on American soil because of its availability, not to mention low price when converted against our weak dollar. (Couple a drug that makes people annoying by-design, with the rambunctiousness of partying with play-money, and you have an eight-million person city at odds with a 23-million person continent.) Perhaps these were only problems to DJs annoyed at being covered in spit particles during the night’s third “Shake It Off” request, spoken in an accent rendered undecipherable by a half-dozen drinks, but after watching this “crazy” documentary, maybe Australians really do love cocaine that much ;)

If it’s possible to go into All This Mayhem fresh, without any knowledge of the story aside from a vague recollection of Ben and Tas’ names from the peak X-Games era, you’ll get the most out of the film’s “holy shit” factor. Coming from a generation that invented “the vert button,” this should not be difficult.